Men's Health

Penile Implant Surgery in India: Understanding the Cost with EDTreatmentINDIA

If you are considering penile implant surgery in India, one of the first questions you may have is about the cost of the procedure. Penile implant surgery, also known as penile prosthesis surgery, is a treatment option for men with erectile dysfunction (ED) that cannot be successfully treated with other methods. It involves placing a device inside the penis to help achieve and maintain an erection.

The cost of penile implant surgery in India can vary significantly depending on a number of factors, including the type of implant chosen, the complexity of the procedure, and the location of the surgery. Here at EDTreatmentINDIA, we offer a range of implant options to suit different needs and budgets.

One of the most common types of penile implants is the inflatable penile implant, which consists of two cylinders that are inserted into the penis, a pump placed in the scrotum, and a reservoir placed in the abdomen. This type of implant allows the patient to control the firmness of the erection by squeezing the pump. The cost of inflatable penile implants in India can range from approximately 250,000 INR to 400,000 INR.

Another type of penile implant is the malleable penile implant, which consists of two rods that are inserted into the penis and can be bent up or down to achieve an erection. This type of implant is less expensive than the inflatable option, with prices starting at around 200,000 INR.

It’s important to note that the cost of penile implant surgery in India is not typically covered by insurance, so it’s important to discuss payment options with your surgeon. At EDTreatmentINDIA, we offer flexible payment plans to make the procedure more affordable for our patients.

If you are considering penile implant surgery in India, it’s important to choose a reputable and experienced surgeon. Our team at EDTreatmentINDIA is led by Dr. Rupin Shah, a highly skilled and respected urologist with over 25 years of experience in penile implant surgery. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality of care and achieving the best possible results for our patients.

To learn more about the cost of penile implant surgery in India and how EDTreatmentINDIA can help, contact us today. Our team will be happy to answer any questions you may have and help you explore your treatment options.

Uncategorized

I am 50 years old and paying my dues to be cryonized. solution in search of a problem. The metaverse is still one

I am a transhumanist: we research prosthetics and neuroprosthetics to increase our ability to decide about life. I collaborate with the National Center for Oncological Research

Penile Prosthetics Surgery in India

Which apocalypse scares you the most today? The threat of nuclear war in our Oxford panel has grown to 10% – a one in ten possibility – and is a very high percentage compared to the rest of the 70 years since the last atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki.

Has the balance of terror worked for these 70 years so far?

And this good news was not at all easy to predict 70 years ago.

There are things that are difficult to predict, and what’s more, the future.

But let’s analyze how the superpowers have exercised their deterrent power: at the less aggressive and more gradualist end is economic power: the United States uses it continuously and now against China.

And Hollywood-style cultural softpower.

And at the other end of the deterrent resources would be the nuclear arsenal.

The tactical is more gradable than the strategic, which would lead us to the MAD.

The power of mutual assured destruction (MAD) of nuclear weapons is paradoxically so enormous – the end of humanity – that it is not much of a deterrent.

Is it so apocalyptic as to be useless?

And Russia has the largest strategic nuclear arsenal on the planet.

However, it does not serve to deter Ukraine right now.

This lack of gradualness in nuclear deterrence, which cannot be used a little, also explains the outcome of the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962.

It ended up on tables, because we can want to kill but not die killing.

Unless someone makes a mistake. That is why the Petrov incident of 1983 seems so revealing and we named our club after him. The Soviet officer saw on the detectors in the command center that US missiles were about to fall on cities in the USSR.

Why didn’t he activate the tactical reaction?

Because he preferred to distrust the detection and alert system; it skipped the chain of command and required confirmation before pressing buttons.

Did it distress him to make the decision alone?

And the satellites confirmed that he had been right in mistrusting the alert.

Eternal gratitude to Stanislav Petrov!

But the danger now is the tactic of escalation and de-escalation applied by Russia: collar Ukraine, negotiate… Return to collar, negotiate… The risk is that, instead of collaring Ukraine, it is Ukraine that will be collared by Putin and without expect nothing more than to get him out.

Why do you hate him? Isn’t it manual?

Because desperation can lead him to try to use the great tactical nuclear card as an instrument of escalation.

Don’t think Washington has it figured out?

We want to think so, but seeing the day to day of the war…

And we are not talking about the disaster in Afghanistan.

We doubt whether Kyiv-Washington-Moscow have just come to an understanding… And we can’t always trust a Petrov.

Don’t you think there is continuous communication between all chancelleries today?

What we do know is that no prediction can exclude the chance that leads to tragedies.

Is climate change more predictable?

The good news is that the extreme scenarios have stopped getting worse; the bad thing is that the centrals have deteriorated.

We won’t die of heat, but of thirst?

It is a systemic and global threat, complex and diffuse, but that does not make it any less certain. Now we need to think about how to mitigate the damage from these central scenarios: energy to air-condition hundreds of megalopolises with millions of inhabitants; adapt agriculture; managing climate migration…

What have we learned from the pandemic?

Reality is always more surprising than our ability to anticipate it. Nobody thought about global value chains, supply chains: today we know that they are everything in our lives.

Isn’t it impossible to foresee its disruption?

We have artificial intelligence systems at Oxford that try.

Are you still a transhumanist leader?

I am, because I believe that life is also worth it for our descendants and the only way to protect it is to evolve by adapting and it consists of empowering our bodies and brains with technologies.

Which is?

New drugs, neural implants, prostheses… I believe that humans have improved the world and we have the opportunity to continue progressing.

What will we make more progress on?

Artificial intelligence has surprised us as much as neuroprosthetics or Elon Musk’s space exploration. This leaves us open to the possibilities of what we already have on our planet and don’t yet fully understand.

Woman Health

A Better Way to Screen for Cervical Cancer

FOR DECADES, the Pap smear has been the primary screening tool for cervical cancer in Canada, and anyone with a cervix who is over the age of 21 or who has been sexually active is advised to get one every three years.

Read : Cancer Treatment in India

This regular and accurate screening is important because, according to the Canadian Cancer Society, an estimated 1,450 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2022, and nearly 400 will die from it. Cervical cancer is also the fourth-most frequent cancer among Canadian women between 15 and 44 years of age.

To help boost early and accurate detection of the disease, Quebec has announced it will start using the human papillomavirus (HPV) test as its first step to screen for cervical cancer, instead of the Pap smear. HPV is the main risk factor for developing the disease, and the province will begin systematically offering HPV testing for cervical cancer screening to all women aged 25 to 65, every five years.

How do we currently screen for cervical cancer in Canada?

During a Pap smear, cells are collected from the cervix and then examined under a microscope by a technician, who looks for the presence of cancer cells or other cellular abnormalities that could signal a malignancy. Those results are shared with the patient’s doctor, who determines the next course of action.

But, according to Eduardo Franco, director of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology at McGill University in Montreal, Pap smears are only able to detect cancer and precancerous lesions 53 percent of the time. So there’s nearly a 50-50 chance

they will go undetected. To account for this margin of error, Pap smears are recommended every three years.

Why is HPV testing better?

Cells are collected in the same fashion for an HPV test as they are for a Pap smear—the difference lies in how the sample is examined. The process of examining a sample for HPV is entirely automated. First, the sample is processed chemically to highlight the presence of any DNA from high-risk types of HPV. Then, it’s assessed in a robotic workstation to detect positivity for HPV. As a result of its heightened sensitivity, the HPV test is able to identify any cellular abnormalities present in a sample about 95 percent of the time.

“The advantage of being more sensitive is that women don’t need to come as often for screening,” says Franco. The only disadvantage of using HPV testing as a primary screening tool for cervical cancer is its lack of specificity. HPV causes nearly all cervical cancers, but the majority of women who have HPV will not develop cancer. That means many who test positive on an HPV test will actually be cancer-free—but they won’t know that until further testing is done. Depending on the type of HPV they have, people who test positive may be sent for a Pap smear, and if that is positive, for a colposcopy (a procedure in which a doctor examines the cervix with a magnifying lens). The inaccuracy of the Pap smear is less of an issue here, because if the technician already knows that the sample came from a person who is HPV-positive, they have a better idea of what to look for in the smear.

HPV screening has replaced Pap smears in many countries, including Australia and the Netherlands, says Dr. Amanda Selk, president of the Society of Canadian Colposcopists. Here in Canada, she says, most provinces are planning to follow Quebec’s lead. Ontario, for example, plans to launch its program by 2025.

Will the Pap smear eventually become obsolete?

For the time being, Paps will remain a way to triage HPV tests. “If a person tests positive for HPV, Pap smears can help sort out who needs to be seen first in colposcopy,” explains Selk. But even though Pap smears are still a part of the larger process of detecting cancer, many believe its days as a primary testing tool are long gone.

“I think the Pap smear has outlived its course and [its] advantages,” says Dr. Modupe Tunde-Byass, an obstetrician and gynecologist at North York General Hospital in Toronto. “Now we have something better.”

Uncategorized

We are made to move

Toddlers love to run around discovering their world with their newfound mobility.

List of Best Bone Marrow Transplant Doctor in India 

In our hunter-gatherer days, our advantage over the animals we wanted to hunt and eat was that, over long distances, we could outrun them, which highlights we are made to move.

Imagine — we are made to outrun an eland.

Harvard Medical Review previews of treatment breakthroughs for illnesses arrive in my inbox daily and exercise is recommended as part of almost every treatment regimen.

If the benefits of exercise could be packaged into pill form, it would be advertised as a wonder drug and fly off the shelves, because exercise is good for everything.

Exercise produces feel-good hormones, particularly endorphins, which reduce pain and boost pleasure and positivity.

Who doesn’t want to feel happier? Dopamine is a hormone we produce when we complete a task. Being consistent with exercise gives us a dopamine hit and raises confidence. Exercise helps our brains stay focused, assists memory, helps us think more clearly and reduces stress.

For anyone dealing with anxiety, having ways to focus under stress is welcome.

Additionally, exercise makes us aware of our breath, and often alerts us to the value of breath work, which can also decrease stress.

Exercise creates energy. Often when we have only been moving from our desk, to our car or ride home, to the couch and then to bed, our energy ebbs and fatigue can become a weight too heavy to budge.

Physical activity increases our heart rate and gets our blood flowing. More oxygen and nutrients to our muscles mean higher energy levels.

The combination of less stress and more energy gives us a greater sense of coping.

Sleep, that beautiful experience, is vastly aided by exercise. Weight loss is often a number one reason to exercise, but while it burns calories, eating healthy amounts and types of food is more crucial.

The determination and discipline that assists in maintaining a regular exercise routine and healthy eating often reinforce each other.

Physical strength comes from muscles and bones. I remind myself when I pick up a kettlebell that weight-bearing exercises help pack my bone marrow with healthy density so that I don’t get osteoporosis and break limbs, should I fall in later life. I am up for dense bones.

Exercise helps decrease aches and pains, and assists our joints to remain flexible, assisting us to move more easily as we age.

Moving regularly can assist in keeping a range of illnesses at bay or lessen their symptoms.

This includes diabetes, stroke, heart conditions, high blood pressure and cholesterol, some cancers, inflammation and even dementia.

The toll of ill-health on our body, mind, finances and time is far greater than the exertion of exercise.

Physical activity literally keeps us alive for longer so it makes sense to find an exercise form that gives you some joy while building fitness.

The wonderful thing about fitness and strength training is that it won’t let you down — the more you practise, the easier it becomes.

Even if you begin with one full-body stretch a day, I invite you to move. You will begin to look forward to experiencing the miraculous network of bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons, blood and breath that carry you more lightly.

You may even be reminded of when you were a toddler, discovering your world for the first time.

Good Health

To Your Good Health

My brother took turmeric every day, after hearing all the hype about it being the new superfood. At his next annual checkup, it was noted that his blood platelets were very low. A month later he died of a stroke.

He was 70. After doing some research on turmeric, I read that indeed it can lower your blood platelets. Is there any chance that low platelets can cause a stroke? This is just a precautionary tale for your readers. — J.S.

ANSWER: I am very sorry to hear of your brother.

Turmeric is a commonly used culinary spice that’s also used as a medication widely throughout the world. It is generally considered safe. However, there is ample evidence that curcumin (the active substance in turmeric) can increase bleeding risk, acting in a way similar to aspirin to reduce “stickiness” of platelets. Turmeric does not cause the platelet levels to go down, but rather interferes with their function.

In most cases, this reduces the risk of stroke. Most strokes are caused by blood clots, and aspirin and similar drugs are often used to reduce the risk of strokes caused by blood clots.

Unfortunately, any medical intervention runs the risk of causing an untoward effect. In your brother’s case, it’s possible the stroke was caused by bleeding inside the head.

He may have had a condition that lowered his platelets — there are many, but the most common is an autoimmune disease called idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura — which may have made the additional effect of turmeric on his platelet function more dangerous.

People with any bleeding disorder or those who are taking medication to prevent clotting, such as warfarin, apixaban (Eliquis) or clopidogrel (Plavix), should discuss curcumin or turmeric supplements with their doctor before taking.

DEAR DR. ROACH: In a recent article regarding acid reflux, you mentioned Pepcid or Zantac as good options to treat occasional symptoms. I have seen these same two medications suggested before. But I never see cimetidine recommended. I am 75 years old and have used the OTC dosage for about 10 years with good results. I take it a few times a month, usually before I eat any Italian food or if I’m going to eat after 7 p.m. What I like about this med is the instructions indicate you can take it before, during or after eating. I believe that’s different from Pepcid and Zantac. Are there any problems taking cimetidine occasionally? — K.L.

ANSWER: All of those medicines, as well as nizatidine (Axid), are called histamine 2 blockers, and all are good choices for occasional stomach upset from excess acid reflux. Cimetidine (Tagamet) was the first one approved in the U.S., and is still a good choice. None of the drugs you mention are affected by eating, so all can be taken with or without food. Cimetidine has more potential for drug interactions.

The list is very long, so check with your pharmacist. It can occasionally cause gynecomastia (breast development in men) and erectile dysfunction. Cimetidine may also be more likely to cause dizziness and confusion. However, if you have never had problems, you aren’t likely to develop them, especially when taking occasionally. These problems tend to develop more frequently with long-term use.

Ranitidine by several manufacturers has recently been found to be contaminated with a carcinogen called NDMA, but cimetidine and famotidine (Pepcid) have not.

Trauma

I can’t even undress in front of my husband because of the trauma

A VICTIM of predator GP Krishna Singh has said his assaults have had a ‘horrendous’ effect on her.

The woman yesterday welcomed the judge’s verdict but said he should have been forced to spend longer in prison given the scale of his crimes.

The woman, who asked to remain anonymous, said the GP had assaulted her and ‘tried to kiss’ her on multiple occasions.

She said: ‘He touched me inappropriately, touching my breasts when he did not need to.

‘He was very touchy-feely; he tried to kiss you all the time. After it happened a few times, I started taking my husband with me.’

The victim’s abuse began when she was in her early thirties and had gone to see Singh about getting a breast reduction to stop the ongoing pain she was experiencing.

After taking advice on losing weight before undergoing surgery, the woman returned to Singh to ask whether she could now be referred for treatment.

She said: ‘I asked him whether he would put me forward for this [surgery] now and he said, “There is no need when you have got lovely [breasts] like these” and put his hands on them.’

He continued to touch her inappropriately, so the victim began bringing her husband to the appointments.

She said: ‘Nothing happened when I took my husband.’

The victim said she now can’t even undress in front of her husband because of the trauma. She added: ‘Obviously a lot of appointments are over the phone now, but if I do have to go in, the only time I feel comfortable is when I see a nurse.’

The victim was pleased Singh received a prison sentence of 12 years. She said: ‘I am overly delighted that he got 12 years because I never expected him to get that.

‘Twelve years isn’t a long time, he really should have got more, but considering his age I am totally happy with that because I was expecting about five years or less – I thought he would get out.’

Solicitor Laura Connor, who represented 16 of Singh’s victims, said: ‘The victims and the wider community deserve a full public inquiry into why the authorities did not put a stop to Singh sooner.’

Blood disorders

Turmeric can up risk in patients with blood disorders

Dear Dr. Roach: My brother took turmeric every day, after hearing about it being the new superfood. At his next annual checkup, it was noted that his blood platelets were low. A month later he died of a stroke. He was 70. After doing some research on turmeric, I read that it can lower your blood platelets. Is there any chance that low platelets can cause a stroke?

J.S.

I am very sorry to hear of your brother.

Turmeric is a commonly used culinary spice that’s also used as a medication throughout the world. It is generally considered safe. However, there is ample evidence that curcumin (the active substance in turmeric) can increase bleeding risk, acting in a way similar to aspirin to reduce “stickiness” of platelets. Turmeric does not cause the platelet levels to go down, but rather interferes with their function.

In most cases, this reduces the risk of stroke. Most strokes are caused by blood clots, and aspirin and similar drugs are often used to reduce the risk of strokes caused by blood clots. Unfortunately, any medical intervention runs the risk of causing an untoward effect. In your brother’s case, he may have had a condition that lowered his platelets, which may have made the additional effect of turmeric on his platelet function more dangerous.

People with any bleeding disorder or those who are taking medication to prevent clotting, such as warfarin, apixaban (Eliquis) or clopidogrel (Plavix), should discuss turmeric supplements with their doctor.

Dear Dr. Roach: In a recent article on acid reflux, you mentioned Pepcid or Zantac as good options. I have seen these meds suggested before. But I never see cimetidine recommended. I am 75 years old and have used the OTC dosage for about 10 years with good results. I take it a few times a month, usually before I eat any Italian food or if I’m going to eat after 7 p.m. What I like about this med is the instructions indicate you can take it before, during or after eating. I believe that’s different from Pepcid and Zantac. Are there any problems taking cimetidine occasionally?

K.L.

All of those medicines, as well as nizatidine (Axid), are called histamine 2 blockers, and all are good choices for occasional stomach upset from excess acid reflux. Cimetidine (Tagamet) was the first one approved in the U.S., and is still a good choice. None of the drugs you mention are affected by eating, so all can be taken with or without food. Cimetidine has more potential for drug interactions. The list is very long, so check with your pharmacist. It can occasionally cause gynecomastia (breast development in men) and erectile dysfunction. Cimetidine may also be more likely to cause dizziness and confusion. However, if you have never had problems, you aren’t likely to develop them, especially when taking occasionally. These problems tend to develop more frequently with long-term use.

Ranitidine by several manufacturers has recently been found to be contaminated with a carcinogen called NDMA, but cimetidine and famotidine (Pepcid) have not.

breast cancer

Multiple Moles Tied To Breast Cancer Risk

The number of moles located on a woman’s left arm may the simplest way to predict whether a she will get breast cancer has been demonstrated in two new studies. The first was lead by researcher Marina Kvaskoff, PhD, a fellow at Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School who’s E3N Teachers Study Cohort tracked more than 89,900 women over an 18-year period. The second, known as the Nurses’ Health Study in the United States, followed 74,523 women for 24 years. What they both found was that “women with 15 or more moles on their left arm were up to 35% more likely to develop breast cancer, compared to women with no moles on their arm.”

Moles on Your Arm May Help to Assess Skin And Breast Cancer Risk

Check this Article: Penile Implant Surgery in India Cost

“We don’t think that nevi actually cause breast cancer, but there could be several reasons for the association we observed, including genetic and hormonal factors,” stated Kvaskoff.

Her study suggested that genes could be a key player in risk for both conditions, while the Nurses’ Health Study linked the number of moles on a woman’s arm to higher blood levels of the sex hormones estrogen and testosterone, which in turn may contribute to breast cancer risk. “We know that having a large number of common nevi is the number one risk factor for melanoma, and that there’s a link between melanoma and breast cancer, and earlier studies have connected skin moles to increased risk for a number of other disorders influenced by hormones, including endometriosis (a condition in which tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows outside of the pelvis), uterine fibroids, and thyroid disease,” she continued.

It was also noted that hormones during pregnancy have a tendency to increase the size and deepen the color of moles. Meanwhile, researchers involved with the Nurses Study found that postmenopausal women with upwards of 6 moles had “higher blood levels of estrogen and testosterone, compared to women without any,” and led them to surmise that “that moles may be a marker of higher hormonal levels, which in turn may predict breast cancer risk.”

Moles Tied To Breast Cancer

Source:http://m.edtreatmentindia.com/

breast cancer

Too Many Women Electing Unnecessary Double Mastecomies

Despite so much information about breast cancer risks available, a new study published in JAMA Surgery last month found that many breast cancer patients are electing to have a double mastectomy even when their individual risks don’t justify such drastic surgery.

Double Mastectomies

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Women with the BRCA 1 or 2 genetic mutation and/or those with a very strong family history of breast cancer do have a significantly high risk for developing breast cancer and for them, prophylactic bilateral mastectomy, may be appropriate.

Fewer than 10 percent of women with newly diagnosed breast cancer in one breast are estimated to have one or both of these clinical indications.

However, when lead author Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and her colleagues evaluated the medical records of more than 1400 women with diagnosed breast cancer in one breast, nearly 70 percent of those who had their unaffected breast removed were never at high risk for developing a new cancer.

The authors stated that it is misplaced fear that drives the decision.

In addition to the obvious need for better education of the patient regarding risks, the authors correctly question how surgeons who agree to such an extensive procedure which is not clinically indicated can justify that decision simply to reduce their patient’s fear.

Clearly there is a need for women to feel more empowered when faced with a diagnosis of breast cancer, to take a deep breath when they first hear the terrifying words “you have cancer” and then take some time to understand their individual risks and options. Often that may mean seeking more than one opinion.

Breast Surgery After Breast Cancer

Source: http://www.edtreatmentindia.com/

Woman Health

Young Women Often Ignore Heart Attack Symptoms

When the topic of heart attack arises, many envision a middle aged, or older man, clutching his chest. However, each year, more than 15,000 women under the age of 55 die of heart disease in the United States, making it the leading cause of death for women in this age group. According to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, coronary heart disease is the leading cause of premature death (death before age 75) in women in the county. Furthermore, among younger women, those that suffer a heart attack are nearly twice as likely as men to die. A new study published on February 24 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes may help explain the reason for these sad statistics.

Young Woman Heart Attack Symptoms

Source: HEALTH AND WELLNESS BLOG INDIA

The study authors note that prompt recognition of acute myocardial infarction (MI; heart attack) symptoms and timely treatment significantly increase the likelihood of a good outcome. They explain that relatively little is known about the initial symptoms and treatment of women 55 years of age or younger. Symptom recognition and prompt, appropriate therapy would reduce the risk of treatment delays and improve acute care for these women.

The study group comprised 30 women ranging in age from 30 t0 55 years who were hospitalized for an acute MI. The researchers conducted in-depth interviews of these women to assess their early symptoms and their decision-making process to seek medical treatment. Five themes described their experiences: (1) prodromal (early) symptoms varied significantly in both nature and duration; (2) the women inaccurately assessed personal risk of heart disease and commonly attributed their symptoms to noncardiac (not heart-related) causes; (3) competing and conflicting priorities influenced their decisions regarding seeking acute care; (4) the healthcare system was not consistently responsive to them, resulting in delays in workup and diagnosis; and (5) the women did not routinely access primary care, including preventive care for heart disease.

The authors concluded that the women in the study did not accurately assess their cardiovascular risk, reported poor preventive health behaviors, and delayed seeking care for symptoms. This suggested that differences in both prevention and acute care may be contributing to young women’s elevated acute MI mortality, compared to men. They noted that identifying factors that promote better cardiovascular knowledge, improved preventive healthcare, and prompt care-seeking behaviors are important factors for decreasing mortality among these women.

According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, approximately 35% of all heart attacks in women go unnoticed or unreported, partly because women’s symptoms are sometimes different from men’s. Many women experience nausea as their primary symptom, along with chest discomfort. Women should also be alert to heartburn that doesn’t go away with antacids or other prescribed medicine.

Signs of a heart attack in women include:

  • Discomfort in the chest that usually lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back; it may feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain.
  • Upper body discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or stomach. Shortness of breath.
  • Unusual fatigue, weakness, and/or lightheadedness. Nausea/vomiting, cold sweats, and/or dizziness.

If you experience the above symptoms:

  • Minutes matter! Call 9-1-1 for help within five minutes if you think you may be having a heart attack.
  • Do not drive yourself or anyone else with symptoms to the hospital, unless you have absolutely no other option.
  • While you are waiting for the ambulance to arrive, chew a regular (325 milligram) aspirin, lie down, and breathe slowly, all of which may help limit the damage to your heart.
Chest Pain on Left Side;Causes,Diagnosis, and Symptoms

Health Blog URL:http://blog.edtreatmentindia.com/